Ask me anything   A miscellaneous blog made out of miscellaneous things

murrayed:

Bevshots are photographs of alcohol under a microscope. These high-quality photographs of your favorite beers, wines, cocktails, liquors, and mixers were taken after they were crytallized on a slide and shot under a polarized light microscope. As the light refracts through the beverage crystals, the resulting photos feature naturally magnificent colors and composition.

Liquid beauty in a glass of rhum !

(via scinerds)

— 1 year ago with 712 notes

dynamicafrica:

DYNAMIC AFRICANS: Discover Somalia bloggers collective

Birthed out of the frustration of the mostly negative and one-dimensional depictions of their country, and armed with the ‘responsibility of building a better Somalia’, the curators behind the blog Discover Somalia make use of imagery and other sourced information in an attempt to “change the negative perceptions and stereotypes of Somalia”, and create a platform that showcases the diversity of life in Somalia.
In about five sentences or less, can you tell us a little bit about who the people behind the ‘Discover Somalia’ initiative are?
Discover Somalia was created by a group made of Somali diaspora, mostly college students in United Sates and the United Kingdom who are very much up to date on current affairs in Somalia and/or are involved with Somalia in their respective studies. After seeing how Somalia is portrayed in the mainstream media, we wanted to take ownership. We ourselves relevant as free Somalis at this historic moment in our country wanted to help define and shape the country we want. We never got to experience how a stable Somalia looks like, but we want to take responsibility of building a better Somalia that can live up to the promise of all its peoples.
 
What are the main objectives of your blog? What led or inspired you to create it?
 
Discover Somalia is an online photography blog that attempts to change the negative perceptions and stereotypes of Somalia. Somalia is not a place of war and famine and destruction and all these horrible things, we so often hear in the mainstream media, but it’s a place where normal people do normal things all the time, just like we do. We wanted to start a project that could be more all-encompassing, we wanted a collection of images that showcases Somalia’s progress and normalcy. We have many present and future objectives, but for now we want display  images progress and history of Somalia, so that people understand that there is to Somalia . 

In visiting Discover Somalia, what would you most like people to gain from your blog?

For decades, mainstream and Somali media,  have and continue to documented a seemingly endless cycle of wars and famine in Somalia, exposing otherwise ignored tragedies to the global audience. But too often the subjects of these images seem to be reduced to symbols, and viewers do not encounter them as fully rounded human beings. And we rarely see photos of the Somalia’s  progress or the cultural heritage and history of Somalia. A complicated country is often reduced to caricature. So when people come to our blog we want them to instantly see a different Somalia that they don’t witness else where.

Photography seems to play a huge role in your blog’s aesthetic, do you plan on including other forms of artistic/media narratives?

Everyone sees things differently. Put 100 photographers in a room and you’ll get 100 different photos. The way you see the world is unique, and photography lets you share that perspective with othersWe saw too many people focusing on images of the deadly  explosions in Mogadishu, while turning  a blind eye to the entrepreneurs, footballers, beach goers and the reconstruction of Mogadishu. We believe that even though Somalia is busily rising out of the ashes, to the majority of the world; it will remain for a long while, the land of starving children, AK47 wielding rebels and greedy big-stomach-small-brain politicians. It takes a long time to change a bad image… but we can do it, one photograph at a time. 

Lastly, why the title ‘Discover Somalia’?

We had many names in mind for our blog, but at the end we decided with “Discover Somalia”, because we wanted people to discover the other side of Somalia through photography ,showing Somalia’s progress and the resilient of it’s people.

Visit the blog at: http://discoversomalia.tumblr.com/

(via eastafricaart)

— 1 year ago with 191 notes
centuriespast:

Reliquary Guardian Figure (Eyema-o-Byeri)
The Fang preserved ancestral skulls and bones in cylindrical containers with wooden figures bound to the lids, with the feet dangling over the edge, symbolically evoking the ancestor and guarding the relics.
Artist: Master of Ntem
Culture: Fang (Mvai subgroup)
Medium: Wood, iron
Place Made: Gabon
Dates: 1750-1860
Brooklyn Museum

centuriespast:

Reliquary Guardian Figure (Eyema-o-Byeri)

The Fang preserved ancestral skulls and bones in cylindrical containers with wooden figures bound to the lids, with the feet dangling over the edge, symbolically evoking the ancestor and guarding the relics.

(via enter-the-fossa)

— 1 year ago with 52 notes
ikenbot:


The Sharpest View of The Sun
Here is one of the sharper views of the Sun ever taken. This stunning image shows remarkable details of a dark sunspot across the image bottom and numerous boiling granules which appear like kernels of corn across the top. Taken in 2002, the picture was made using the Swedish Solar Telescope operating on the Canary Island of La Palma.
Credit: SST, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences

ikenbot:

The Sharpest View of The Sun

Here is one of the sharper views of the Sun ever taken. This stunning image shows remarkable details of a dark sunspot across the image bottom and numerous boiling granules which appear like kernels of corn across the top. Taken in 2002, the picture was made using the Swedish Solar Telescope operating on the Canary Island of La Palma.

Credit: SST, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences

(Source: afro-dominicano, via afro-dominicano)

— 1 year ago with 14484 notes
Tony Freeth and Alexander Jones. "The Cosmos in the Antikythera Mechanism." ISAW Papers 4 (February, 2012) →

A creative commons attribution license article by Tony Freeth and Alexander Jones about the Antikythera Mechanism, a 2nd century BC work of Hellenistic Greek clockwork describing a geocentric Cosmos. A good read.

— 1 year ago
#archaeology  #greek archaeology  #technology  #ancient technology 
Jenne Jenno seated figurine, from present-day Mali, near the city of Djenné, circa 13th century (?), image taken from http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/1981.218
Of these figurines little is known: no one really knows to what purpose they were used, since most of them, likely including this one, have been looted from archaeological sites to be sold to Western art collectors.
There has been little archaeological work in this part of Africa, so nearly all of them are out of context.
They do however attest to the existence of a vigorous art-making tradition in Middle Ages West Africa, and to the existence of a prosperous urban lifestyle, given that most of them are recovered in the Inland Niger Delta toggeré or man-made hills (“tell”), former mud-built towns or villages.
Many of them are linked to the site of Jenne Jenno, seemingly the former location of the present-day town of Djenné, in Mali, which seems to date to 250 BC and to have had a continued existence up to 1400 AD.
This image is the intellectual property of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Please contact me if you feel it ought to be removed.

Jenne Jenno seated figurine, from present-day Mali, near the city of Djenné, circa 13th century (?), image taken from http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/1981.218

Of these figurines little is known: no one really knows to what purpose they were used, since most of them, likely including this one, have been looted from archaeological sites to be sold to Western art collectors.

There has been little archaeological work in this part of Africa, so nearly all of them are out of context.

They do however attest to the existence of a vigorous art-making tradition in Middle Ages West Africa, and to the existence of a prosperous urban lifestyle, given that most of them are recovered in the Inland Niger Delta toggeré or man-made hills (“tell”), former mud-built towns or villages.

Many of them are linked to the site of Jenne Jenno, seemingly the former location of the present-day town of Djenné, in Mali, which seems to date to 250 BC and to have had a continued existence up to 1400 AD.


This image is the intellectual property of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Please contact me if you feel it ought to be removed.

— 1 year ago with 4 notes
#Africa  #African art  #Archaeology  #Archaeology of Africa  #Mali  #Djenné 
"Chemigram 8/2/61 I, 8 février 1961" by Pierre Cordier, (image intellectual property of Pierre Cordier), uploaded from 
http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/c/camera-less-photography-artists/
Please contact me if you feel it ought to be removed.

"Chemigram 8/2/61 I, 8 février 1961" by Pierre Cordier, (image intellectual property of Pierre Cordier), uploaded from

http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/c/camera-less-photography-artists/

Please contact me if you feel it ought to be removed.

— 1 year ago with 2 notes
#Pierre Cordier  #belgian artists  #art  #contemporary art 
"Heterobranchia tree" phylogenetic network made using a Neighbor Net algorithm.

Uploaded from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neighbor-net

"Heterobranchia tree" phylogenetic network made using a Neighbor Net algorithm.

Uploaded from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neighbor-net

— 1 year ago with 1 note
#science as art  #Neighbor-Net  #Phylogenetic network  #science 

ernesthon:

Beef Burgundy - 

This one one of my favorite one-pot meals. I love making this while it’s still cold out: it’s hearty, rich, and great with winter starches like potatoes and egg noodles.

Every great stew is about maximizing the developing of flavor in the ingredients. The last thing you want to do for such stews is just to throw everything in a pot and put to the simmer, as that would result in a bland mix that lacks depth.

To start, I cook salted fat-back pork or dry cured bacon to render the fat. This step contributes umami, salt, and most importantly fat. With the pot well coated in hot rendered lard, I then sear 2” cubed beef until all the sides are deeply brown. This is probably the most important step in developing rich beef flavor: flavor-producing maillard reactions take place best under low-moisture, high-temperature conditions. After all the browning is done, I then add the liquids. The roux, made from brown butter, wheat flour, and chicken stock will help to thicken the stew. The wine is another important choice - you want a dry medium bodied red wine that has a good deal of acidity to balance the fattiness of the meat. As fitting for its name, a french Burgundy (dominated by Pinor Noir) is best. Finally, a bouquet of aromatics - black pepper, onion, garlic, carrots, thyme, and bay leaf - is added to the pot before covering and slow cooking for 4-6 hours. After the meat is tender, I add some tomato paste, sauteéd mushrooms, and another splash of red wine. 

Serve this with boiled potatoes, mashed potatoes, or the traditional compliment of buttered noodles. 

— 1 year ago with 16 notes
girlratlove:

Fred Tomaselli – Big Raven, 2008

girlratlove:

Fred Tomaselli – Big Raven, 2008

(via thx-happyviolence)

— 1 year ago with 8 notes